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Posts Tagged English

Parkin

Posted 30 October 2013 by
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Parkin is a traditional gingerbread recipe from the north of England. Yorkshire parkin is probably the most famous, but Lancashire have their own too. It’s a gorgeous, spicy, sticky thing; the black treacle immediately brings Bonfire Night to mind, and the spices add more autumnal yumminess. I’ve adapted this recipe from a few different ones I found. I’m not sure where it falls on the Lancashire/Yorkshire divide, although apparently Lancastrian parkin tends to have more flour and less oatmeal.

Parkin Continue reading “Parkin”…

Orange Marmalade Scones

Posted 23 April 2013 by
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In honour of St George’s Day, I thought I’d bake something quintessentially English — scones. Ok, ok I know… they’re Scottish really, but that’s a hell of a lot closer than Greece, which is where old (young?) George was from. Anyway. Not just any scones, but orange marmalade scones; I thought marmalade added a bit of an English Breakfast touch to the affair.

Orange Marmalade Scone

They’re kind of delicious. Not too much sugar, so they’re not overly sweet, and the marmalade adds a lovely rich orange flavour. Now, I’m not saying that Paddington Bear would forgo his marmalade sandwiches for these, but he’d definitely have one or two for afters.

orange maramalade scone

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A Loaf for Lammas

Posted 1 August 2012 by
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In the Northern Hemisphere, it is Lammas Day today – 1st August. Lammas (“loaf mass”) is an ancient celebration of the first harvest. It is one of several holidays celebrated by Neo-Pagans as part of the Wheel of the Year; Lammas falls between Midsummer and the Autumn Equinox. It’s also known as Lughnasadh. The festival celebrates the first harvest of wheat and loaves of bread used to be brought to church to be blessed.

a plaited bread for Lammas Day Continue reading “A Loaf for Lammas”…

Medieval Recipe: York Mayne Bread

Posted 9 January 2011 by
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This is probably the most unusual loaf of bread I’ve ever made. This recipe for Medieval York Mayne bread comes from Marguerite Patten’s 500 Recipes for Bread and Scones, an incredibly battered book that used to belong to my grandmother. The book is full of her comments and modifications next to recipes, with some obscured by cut-outs of what are presumably better versions she found elsewhere. There are no marks next to this recipe, so I don’t know if she ever made mayne bread.

Loaf of York mayne bread with several slices cut from it.

As Marguerite explains, this recipe comes from the 16th century and there are indeed many mentions on the Internet of mayne bread from the middle ages. The term apparently derives from the French pain de mayne (“pain” being bread, “main” being hand) and was sometimes known as paynmayn. Mayne bread was considered the “bread of nobles”, made from wheat flour, as opposed to bread eaten by ordinary Medieval folk made from cheaper grains like rye.

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Bread Sauce

Posted 25 December 2010 by
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Bread sauce is a white sauce that dates back to medieval times and is traditionally served with Christmas dinner. It’s easy to make; you can start infusing the milk in between preparing vegetables and other trimmings and then finish the sauce off while the turkey is resting. If you’re just concentrating on the sauce, it takes about half an hour in total. Onions studded with cloves, infusing millk for bread sauce Continue reading “Bread Sauce”…

Cornish Saffron Bread

Posted 24 November 2010 by
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Like most people, saffron is not exactly an everyday ingredient for me. I came across a half-used packet of saffron in the cupboard with a use-by date of, well, a little while ago. I’m not about to discard such a luxury item, so I had to use it somehow. I bought it in the first place (years ago) to make this bread. I remember it worked out quite well, so thought I’d have another go. This recipe is from Country Bread by Linda Collister and Anthony Blake. Their recipe calls for dried fruit, which I believe is traditional, but my version is non-fruity.

A loaf of Cornish saffron bread, with one slice cut

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English Muffins

Posted 11 November 2010 by
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Mmmm… English muffins. How hard could they be to make? Actually, not hard at all. I was inspired by the beautiful photos on this post over at Pinch My Salt. Looking at the recipe though, I was slightly put off because I didn’t have any buttermilk, so I had a look around for alternative recipes and found this one by Delia — no buttermilk! I’ll have to try the other recipe another time.

Toasted English muffins with butter

English muffins, toasted and buttered

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